World Kidney Day

March 9, 2017

Our bodies are amazing - they heal, they purify, they take us where we need to be and put up with a lot of abuse. The kidneys are hard workers for our bodies and perform vital functions.

The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs that extract waste from blood, balance body fluids, form urine, and aid in other important functions of the body. Because of all of the vital functions the kidneys perform and the toxins they encounter, the kidneys are susceptible to various problems.

Kidney Disease

Early chronic kidney disease has no signs or symptoms, but between 8 and 10% of the adult population have some form of kidney damage, and every year millions die prematurely of complications related to Chronic Kidney Diseases
Kidney disease can affect people of all ages and races. There is no cure for chronic kidney disease, although treatment can slow or halt the progression of the disease and can prevent other serious conditions developing.
High blood pressure (hypertension) and diabetes are the most common causes of kidney disease. The high blood pressure causes just over a quarter of all cases of kidney failure. Diabetes has been established as the cause of around one-third of all cases and is the commonest cause of ESRD in most developed countries.
The good news is that obesity, as well as CKD, is largely preventable. Education and awareness of the risks of obesity and a healthy lifestyle, including proper nutrition and exercise, can dramatically help in preventing obesity and kidney disease.
Blood and urine tests are used to check for kidney disease. The earlier you know you have it, the better your chances of receiving effective treatment.
A kidney transplant is an operation to place a healthy (donor) kidney in your body to perform the functions your own diseased kidneys can no longer perform. Kidney transplantation is considered the best treatment for many people with severe CKD because quality of life and survival are often better than in people who use dialysis